Tuesday, February 9, 2010

Stonewall

Man Week would not be complete without featuring one of the best generals of all time, General Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson. Jackson remains a hero in the South to this day. He is remembered for helping to turn the tide at Bull Run, and sending the Union Army into a panic retreat back to Washington DC.

Jackson died from wounds he received at the Battle of Chancellorsville. Jackson and a small group of men rode behind enemy lines to survey the situation. Upon returning to his front line, the pickets mistook his group for the enemy, and fired upon them. Jackson was shot three times, although his wounds did not appear to be life threatening. As they were carrying him away on a stretcher, one of the medics was shot, and Stonewall was dropped, compounding his injuries. At first it looked like he would survive his injuries, but after his arm was amputated, he began to go down quickly. On Sunday, May 10, 1863, it was clear that he would not make it. He had some time to visit with his wife, and then he began to slip out of consciousness. As he was drifting off, he began to issue orders to General A. P. Hill. His last words were, "Let us cross over the river, and rest under the shade of the trees". I find it interesting that both General Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson, in their last moments, were calling out to General A.P. Hill.

This link is to an original newspaper article withh the obituary of Stonewall Jackson.

7 comments:

  1. When i was a kid we had a neighbor by the name of Thomas Jackson; everyone called him Stonewall--it was his nickname for life. Even up North there existed much respect and admiration for Confederate Generals. We were taught in school that there was honor on both sides of the confrontation.

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  2. Your site is great. Wouldn't Stonewall and the CSA have referred to the Battle of Manassas? The Union named battles after physical things like mountains, or in this case, streams ("Bull Run"), while Southerners used rail junctions (Manassas). Just a generalization, if you will!

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  3. I hope we're going to see some Yankees this week! ;-)

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  4. They were all so brave. Think about the medical care - few painkillers and no antiseptic.

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  5. I see a decided bias toward the southern generals, here. I certainly hope that someone like Jimmy Doolittle will make the grade.

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  6. I see a decided bias towards great generals this week. It'd be a pity to spoil the streak with a Yank.

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  7. He was shot by his own troops, how awful - and they amputated his arm, awful, awful.

    Few people would survive that back then. Must have been infection.

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