Wednesday, February 10, 2010

James Ewell Brown Stuart

What salute to the World's Greatest Generals would be complete without a look at JEB Stuart. Stuart was a dashing officer, often sporting a peacock feather in his hat. On the battlefield he was all business, and one of the great Cavalry commanders of all time. Stuart was killed at the Battle of Yellow Tavern in the War. I find it interesting that he was only 31 years old at the time of his death. A short, but certainly magnificent life.

20 comments:

  1. Don't forget there were Union generals, too. Just sayin'. Love your page still!

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  2. I agree that there’s been a definite Southern bias re the selection of subjects for this week’s topics. However, it’s certainly understandable, and I totally sympathize with the author’s viewpoint.

    The North had its share of great generals too - Grant, McClellan, Burnside, Sherman. However, I’m not at all offended if their photos aren’t featured. After all, Sherman torched Atlanta - his troops burned crops, killed livestock, and destroyed the entire infrastructure. Let’s face it - the Yanks weren’t too humane to their Southern brothers.

    Of course, it’s all related to the morals and values of the era, but it’s amazing what people will do to each other over politics, power, and money.

    Re the early demise of today’s General Stuart, I’ve read that the life expectancy for an average individual in America during the mid-19th Century was around 40 years. The average life expectancy for a Civil War soldier was around 6 months.

    That’s really not surprising.

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  3. Burnside a great General?!? Please explain . . . every thing he touched was an unmitigated Disaster.

    McClellan a great general? Lincoln fired him because he would not fight.

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  4. Sounds like the "Lost Cause" at work here again. As for JEB, all one has to do is say Gettysburg to end the debate.

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  5. The South SHALL rise again! You watch.

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  6. How about some photos of the everyday soldier, Union or Confederate?

    As always, I love this page and look forward to it every day.

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  7. If Sherman had not of burned the crops of the South, we would not be eating those tasty Black-eyed Peas today. In those days Black-eyed Peas were grown as feed for the live stock.

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  8. How about Buford as a truly great cavalry commander? Saved the high ground at Gettysburg, so the Confederates finally had to attack uphill for once.

    And Jeb Stuart didn't do all that well with his 2nd "Ride Around the Union Army" just prior to Gettysburg, nor with his defeat by Custer once he finally got there.

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  9. Ths South may have had some great Generals, but the North had the resources.
    The North was going to win because they had the numbers They had better equipment, better supplies. They also had many more men to send to the slaughter.
    There were also some pretty decent officers in the North.

    As far as the South rising again, do they really want what is left of this great country?

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  10. You southerners can revere whatever Confederate generals you hold in regard, just remember, WE won! =P

    And 'Smartgirl 1953', Sherman's troops destroyed far less than the retreating Confederates did with their scorched earth policy. In fact, the Confederates more than likely started the burning of Atlanta, which Sherman is now demonized for.

    /Just please don't post a picture of N. B. Forrest... Let's not forget he was not only the CO in charge of the Fort Pillow massacre, but also the founder of the KKK.

    -M

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  11. Yes, you did win, but look at the mess we are in.

    The South SHALL rise again.

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  12. I agree with Anon about the scorched earth policy. It wasn't just Sherman, that's just a sound war strategy used to great effect by many armies for centuries. That's why Sherman said "war is hell".
    Someone earlier this week mentioned that PJM should post photos of indian generals. That was already done a few months ago. A week is short - how about Confederate Generals one week and Union generals the next. PJM has covered common soldiers previously. However, photos of famous generals are everywhere. How about other officers, not generals, who served with distinction in the War Between the States? Good or bad distinction - unless this is meant to be only feel good pictures, observing history in all it's facets is interesting.
    I also wonder what is meant by that phrase "The South will Rise Again" in today's world. The South as a force of commerce? It's happening. The South seceding? And give up those federal highway, education, welfare, FEMA, etc etc funds? HA!

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  13. Not enough Union Generals of note to fill up a week.

    The South SHALL rise again from the collapsed pieces of the bankrupt US.

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  14. "If Sherman had not of burned the crops of the South,"

    Folks, that is an absolute myth. The only places he burned where the few that fired at his troops. Folks in Georgia contend he destroyed everything and that is just not the case. Why CSA Cavalry General Wheeler's troopers destroyed more Georgia property than he did. There are numerous accounts that indicate the Georgians would rather see USA troops on the doorstep rather than CSA!

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  15. I am a Canadian living in a small town in Ontario. The house I live in was once owned by General & Mrs Orlando Metcalf Poe. He is the Engineer who set the fires in Atlanta. We have his civil war campaign chest which must be kept in the house for all time. This house was his summer residence when vacationing in Canada.

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  16. Anon, I am not disputing the burnings in ATL, some are intentional, some not, some set by civilians. In Savannah Columbia many fires were set by Southerners trying to keep cotton and other items out of Union hands. In Savannah, Sherman order the fires extinguished.

    Also some of the sacking of Columbia was partially a result of Union troops marching through Camp Sorghum just outside Columbia. Some troopers admitted to seeking revenge for what they saw.

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  17. I've always lived in the New Englad, but I'm a Southern sympathizer, and have always been.

    They may not have had the resources, but they had the fortitude to stand up for their beliefs.

    I really need to move.

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  18. M, I don't know, when Robert E. Lee was asked at Appomattox who was the greatest soldier under his command, he responded, "A man I have never seen, sir. His name is Forrest."

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  19. Yep, Nate Forrest was probably ahead of his time, in terms of tactics. He was all about moving fast and conducting a kind of "mobile war" akin to what would evolve later in the 20th Century in combined armor / infantry units. Controversial figure, too; accused by some of war crimes.

    It's interesting that by the time of the Civil War the old more romantic notion of cavalry vs. cavalry battles, fighting horse to horse with saber and pistol, was obsolete. There were only one or two such fights during the war, neither involving more than a few hundred soldiers (IIRC). In the Civil War cavalry was used more to reconnoiter, move troops quickly to deal with an emergency, and to conduct raids on supply lines and units behind the front lines. Further, they almost never rode directly into battle, but dismounted and fought on foot.

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  20. Well really, it should be called the South's Greatest Generals rather than the World's Greatest Generals, because the only non-US non-Southern General we've seen was Lord Baden Powell, lol. Bias is fine, but don't call it one thing when really, it's another. I have many good friends who love their Southern history just as strongly as I love my Northern history and we all get along fine because we all live in the USA.

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