Friday, February 26, 2010

Cowboys off the Trail

Today's picture features a statue by Frederic Remington called "Cowboys off the Trail". the picture was taken in 1904 at the World Fair at St. Louis. As some mentioned earlier this week, Remington was one of the great ones.

Picture Embargo Threat Level: Orange. The Picture Embargo Threat level has been raised to "Elevated" due to reports of Insolent Chatter in comments yesterday.

19 comments:

  1. This would have made a great mystery photo....name the sculptor, title and place. But, Nate was probably at the 1904 World's Fair in a former life.

    I sure want you to have a tractor, but then half of our comment topics would be gone. It's like a trip where planning is part of the fun.

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  2. These cowboys look like they've had a few...

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  3. Few of what - I can't even see one. Teeth that is.
    El

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  4. It is also known as "Coming Thru The Rye"
    Here is a site wiht a bio on it
    http://www.remington-art.com/New%20Folder/1902%20coming%20thru%20the%20rye%20by%20frederic%20remington.htm
    R

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  5. That horse on the left looks like it took some engineering know-how.

    I often enjoy your comments section as much as the Main Attraction. Even the Insolent Chatterers provided some amusement.

    I look forward to the next installment of your ongoing Eggs for Tractor program.

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  6. Maybe you think this picture embargo thing is humorous, but it comes across as a bid for attention. There are many sources on the web for fantastic old photos. www.Shorpy.com has a great photo every day. We can visit that while you sulk during the embargo.

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  7. Remington was definitely one of the greats. His genre (Western) isn't my favorite, but you can feel the emotion of the subject(s) in every one of his pieces.

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  8. And "Anonymous", let's not be petty. Of course there are other sites to see old pictures, but they just wouldn't be as enjoyable! It would be a tragedy if there was even a one day embargo!

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  9. And "Anonymous", let's not be petty. Of course there are other sites to see old pictures, but they just wouldn't be as enjoyable! It would be a tragedy if there was even a one day embargo!

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  10. Remington was the first artist to really study the movements of the horse so he could accurately depict it in his paintings and sculptures. If I recall correctly he was the first one to depict a horse with all four feet off the ground during the gallop, something that was highly critized in it's day but which modern motion pictures later proved was correct. Anonymous, you should be ashamed of your nasty comments toward PJM. Totally uncalled for--this is HIS blog afterall. PJM - I appreciate your consistency and humor.

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  11. I have to admit, I'm not really interested in the sculpture but I know others are. I was looking at the clothes the two women in the bottom right corner are wearing, heh. But that's just my interest in historical fashion taking over. :-)

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  12. Don't you love it when people remain anonymous yet are offensive themselves?

    I think the picture embargo is funny. I can't wait for next week and pictures of Tina Turner and Mad Max! ;)

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  13. I suspect anonymous comments also raise the threat level, perhaps to 'yellow.'

    Please register, after obtaining the prerequisite sense of humor.

    By the way Dave is, at times, rather wry and sarcastic in his comments on Shorpy. Beware!

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  14. i too wonder where it went? would be nice to see in person, looks like alot of detail, as he was know for that.
    oldbear

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  15. http://www.corcoran.org/ this is where the statue is now!

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  16. It seems the exhibit was an enlarged plaster copy of Remington's original bronze:

    Details

    "At the Roman Bronze Works foundry, Remington and Bertelli struggled with the wax model of what would be called Coming Through the Rye for nearly seven weeks, modifying the artist’s design to solve nearly insurmountable casting problems. By the time the first cast was made, five months had elapsed, and the artist was unsure of the public response the work would receive. “If they like it I’ll swell up—if they don’t I’ll tighten my belt,” he wrote. In 1904 it was enlarged to heroic size in plaster bearing the title Off the Trail, and displayed at the eastern entrance to the Pike, the amusement area within the Louisiana Purchase Exposition grounds in St. Louis. Despite this singular honor, sales of the bronze group were disappointing, in part due to the size of the sculpture and its very steep price—$2,000. Only about eight casts of Coming Through the Rye were produced in Remington’s lifetime; the Amon Carter Museum example illustrated here is cast #12, produced under the authority of the artist’s widow, Eva Remington."

    Being made of plaster, I suspect it no longer exists.

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  17. Instead of a complete ban of all pictures, threaten to put up pictures of Obama, Pelosi, et al. That should scare folks.

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