Monday, January 4, 2010

Henry Ford

Inventor and Innovator week continues here at OPOD with this photograph of Henry Ford. Ford was the first to bring mass production techniques to the automobile, making them affordable to average people for the first time. A Model T could be purchased for about $300. He succeeded in putting America on wheels. The picture above was taken in 1938, and Ford is seated on the right side of the picture.


Well, I had a great time with you all over the Christmas Break, and had some fun on the blog. But, today it is back to work.

15 comments:

  1. Here's my grandma driving T-model Ford m. 1926/7. She was propably the first woman who had the driving license at that time in one small village in Finland.

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  2. Gentleman Farmer?
    I need to know a few things first:
    How many acres?
    How many barns and/or outbuildings?
    What is the water supply?
    What is the condition of your soil?

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  3. I am truly a wicked person. In reading panavia999's comment, my first thought was "Is PJM a Gentleman? Is he different from nearly every other Texan I've ever met in that does he take his hat off in the house or in the presence of a lady?"

    I apologize.

    I love OPOD. I would hate to be banished. My wife yells at me every Saturday morning about loving the computer more than I do her. At least she did until she started actually looking at it.

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  4. I like Henry Ford's suit, good
    tailor, and the hat. The car's
    interior looks sumptuous.

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  5. Did you know about the Ford Culture presentation? During a company meeting in the 20s, all these factory workers were brought into a big auditorium. On stage there was a large prop shaped like a kettle. A line of men in varying types of cultural dress (Polish, German, Irish, etc) walked up to and then behind the kettle. From the other side, they emerged, dressed in Ford factory coveralls, every one of them in uniform. Interesting to think that cultural and political programming was taking place in the corporate environment in the early 20th century, but it was.

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  6. My son-in-law has a Model-T touring car and a One Ton Model-T truck. He and his sons drive them in The 4th of July Parade every year. They are members of the Cowtown Model T club here in Fort Worth.

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  7. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  8. Hitler's friend Henry Ford is getting his own week?

    "Ford and Adolf Hitler admired each other's achievements. Adolf Hitler kept a life-size portrait of Ford next to his desk."I regard Henry Ford as my inspiration," Hitler told a Detroit News reporter two years before becoming the Chancellor of Germany in 1933.In July 1938, four months after the German annexation of Austria, Ford was awarded the Grand Cross of the German Eagle, the highest medal awarded by Nazi Germany to foreigners."

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  9. Henry Ford isn't the only westerner to have a "soft spot" for Hitler. So did old Joe Kennedy and a bunch of others. Hitler's message in the 30's was very attractive to many people - law and order to replace the perceived chaos of the times.

    Mike P.

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  10. That's true - lots of people admired Mussolini and Franco for the same reasons.

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  11. Gentleman Farmer according to Webster's Collegiate Dictionary:
    "A man of superior social position and wealth who farms mainly for pleasure and not for profit."

    My neighbor is a gentleman farmer. He has 200+ acres and raises charolais cattle.

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  12. It’s true (and very interesting) that Henry Ford wasn’t the only notable Hitler/Nazi admirer in the decade that preceded World War II..

    Because of his anti-Semitism ,belief in eugenics, and many trips to Germany, Charles Lindbergh was suspected of being a Nazi sympathizer, and this tarnished his public image.

    Most interestingly though, is the fact that King Edward VIII of England (who famously abdicated the throne in 1936 to marry the scandalous American divorcee Wallis Simpson) visited Germany in 1937 and publicly expressed great admiration for Hitler’s methods of controlling crime. There are photos of him participating in Nazi salutes during that time. It has been rumored that Hitler planned to re-instate Edward as his “puppet” fascist king of Britain after conquering England. It was these supposed pro-Nazi sentiments that caused his brother, King George the VI to ship him and Wallis off to Bermuda.

    Many sources that I’ve come across have indicated that the Prime Minister of England at the time (Stanley Baldwin) and his successor Winston Churchill hated Edward and were not happy when he ascended the throne after the death of his father, King George the V. Edward was considered not too bright and a useless playboy. His political beliefs were a liability and they encouraged him to abdicate. The Wallis Simpson thing was only a cover-up - they wanted to get rid of him anyway.

    PS - Also, there is evidence that suggests that t Wallis Simpson was a hermaphrodite.

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  13. I have to agree with SmartGirl's assessment of Edward. Frankly, Wallis Simpson - whatever her peculiarities (and that's a new rumor to me) - was probably the best thing that ever happened to England.

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  14. Good arguments. I guess Hitler wasn't so bad after all. Except for his words and actions I guess great people like Ford and Lindbergh had no way of knowing Hitler's intentions.

    Moral indifference is intellectual, artistic and fair to history as a whole. I see that now. Thank you.

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  15. Hmmmm. Is he in a Ford in this picture?

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