Monday, November 9, 2009

Home From War

This picture was taken in 1919, and shows a group of soldiers returning home from the war. The picture was taken in 1919. I like looking at the clothes the people in the crowd are wearing.

8 comments:

  1. I am wondering why none of the men in the windows don't have and rank emblem or company insignias on their uniforms or caps or lapels?
    R

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  2. Sorry I made a mistake in my first post.
    I don't want the writing police coming to get me.
    I am wondering why none of the men in the windows don't have any rank emblems or company insignias on their uniforms or caps or lapels?
    R

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  3. Those men are fortunate in that they seem to have come home via some sort of "official" transport. My grandfather served in France during the Great War, and he often told us the US Army made many of the soldiers pay their own way home. He was - understandably - very bitter about that. He was also part of Coxie's army, and loathed Dwight Eisenhaur until the day he died, even though he admitted Ike was only following orders.

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  4. This is a wonderful photo, and it captures the moment perfectly.

    The soldiers hanging out the windows of the train were lucky to escape alive, and it shows on their faces.

    I love the clothes on the women. This picture was taken the year my mother was born (1919).

    It's hard to imagine her living during those times, but I still can't believe she's gone.

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  5. I find it very interesting that nearly everyone in the photo is wearing a hat! Even one of those straw hats that were called "boaters" .
    I agree the soldiers all look the same, you cannot tell their rank. There must have been some reason..perhaps this was one of those hospital trains that transported troops from the east coast to the west coast..although they look pretty happy and healthy.:)

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  6. After WW1, my grandfather, who spoke french, stayed in France a long time to help relocate French POW's. I believe he served in the Canadian army. I think he stayed on a while on his own to enjoy a dissolute life.

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