Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Old Time Butcher Shop


Today's picture shows an old time butcher shop in Gorinchem. The picture was taken in the 1930's. It was submitted by Rob from Amerfoort, a long time visitor to the OPOD. When I zoom in on the picture and look closely, I start thinking that I bet one of those sausages would sure be good right about now. I miss these old time meat markets.
Oh yes, there is still time for you all to submit favorite family photos this week. I will get through as many of them as I can.

20 comments:

  1. Rob...Do you have any idea what the object in the window is? I looks like maybe a meat airplane.

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  2. GeezerNYC, many old stores would put up window displays to grab attention. A number of these commemorated important events taking place in the world. The airplane in the display is a Fokker F.VII - one of the most popular airplanes in the 1920s and a great source of national pride for the Dutch. In 1929, Royal Dutch Airlines inaugurated a regular route to the East Indies (at the time, the longest regular route in the world). I would guess that this display might be related to that event.

    Rob, is this building still standing? If so, have you visited it?

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  3. The detail in this photo is great when you enlarge it.

    Notice the bicycle on the right. And there appears to be a couple of those honeycomb paper bells haning in the window to to the right. Maybe this photo was taken around Christmas.

    I only have one question - why does the shopkeeper in the photo appear so hostile? His fisted hands are on his hips in an angry manner and his face isn't cheerful at all.

    Could it be that he didn't want his picture taken??

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  4. Sorry, the bicycle is on the LEFT. I'm all turned around this morning.

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  5. I seem to remember that there was a Nazi concentration camp in Amersfort during WWII.

    Rob - have you ever visited the Anne Frank museum and house in Amerstadam???

    The Holocaust was still a recent event around the time I was born (but to my daughter it's ancient history).

    My parents gave me The Diary of Anne Frank to read when I was about nine years old (because they felt it was an important issue), and I can tell you that it gave me nightmares for years.

    I was afraid that there were still Nazis around who were going to come and get us, even though we weren't Jewish.

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  6. Re:Paper Bells. The Christmas tree front and center is another powerful clue as to the time of year.

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  7. I like all the detail in this picture too. I keep finding interesting things. The first time I looked at it I didn't notice the gentleman has wooden shoes on..very cool.

    Also, doesn't the word "varkensslachterij" mean "pig slaughterhouse"?

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  8. Thank you PJM for showing this picture. And thank you Nate for your explanation about the plane, I didn’t realize it was a plane, let along a Fokker. It is a good idea to visit the place and see if the building still stands, I will certainly do that in the near future!

    There is indeed a small Christmas tree in the window so the photo is taken around Christmas. My father’s father was a butcher, he slaughtered pigs and sold the meat in his shop. Hence the name varkens (pigs) slachterij (slaughterhouse). And why he looks so grumpy, I don’t know, I wish I could ask him. But he died before I was born. I noticed the 3 digit telephone number, there weren’t many phones around then. To confirm the Dutch stereotype there is a bicycle , and he is wearing clogs.

    I’m impressed that SmartGirl knows there was a (small) concentration camp near Amersfoort. It’s not something to be proud of. The Anne Frank museum in Amsterdam is about 15 minutes away from where I work. But there is always a very long queue, so I’m still trying to figure out what is the best time to visit the place.

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  9. varkensslachterij is Dutch for pig slaughtering
    R

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  10. what a great picture and I'm so happy it was scanned at such a high quality. Its so fun to see all the details like the Christmas bells and tree.

    My biggest pet peeve is when my family will scan a picture for everyone to have a copy and its a lousy small scan..

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  11. Rob:

    Thank you for the compliment - I have always been interested in WWII and the Holocaust, which was still a recent event when I was born. Both sides of my family fought in that war.

    As noted above, I read “The Diary of Anne Frank” before I was ten years old, because my parents gave me the book. and told me that it was important and that I had to read it. The following year, someone gave my father the famous book “The Rise and Fall of The Third Reich” and I read THAT, too, all on my own. (As you can imagine, I was a very serious child). Both of those books terrified me beyond belief - I had nightmares for months.

    I think what made such an impact on me was that although my family is of Italian heritage, we always had a lot of Jewish friends (and we still do). Therefore, the victims in those terrible holocaust photographs and newsreels that we’ve all seen weren’t strangers - to me they were people that I KNEW. That was my first exposure to the evil that people are capable of perpetuating upon each other..

    On a lighter note, your photo is great, and I love the fact that those paper bells in the shop window look exactly like the ones we can still buy today. It gives one a comforting sense of continuity.

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  12. Rob:

    The above post is me.

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  13. Rob:

    Thank you for the compliment - I have always been interested in WWII and the Holocaust, which was still a recent event when I was born. Both sides of my family fought in that war.

    As noted above, I read “The Diary of Anne Frank” before I was ten years old, because my parents gave me the book. and told me that it was important and that I had to read it. The following year, someone gave my father the famous book “The Rise and Fall of The Third Reich” and I read THAT, too, all on my own. (As you can imagine, I was a very serious child). Both of those books terrified me beyond belief - I had nightmares for months.

    I think what made such an impact on me was that although my family is of Italian heritage, we always had a lot of Jewish friends (and we still do). Therefore, the victims in those terrible holocaust photographs and newsreels that we’ve all seen weren’t strangers - to me they were people that I KNEW. That was my first exposure to the evil that people are capable of perpetuating upon each other..

    On a lighter note, your photo is great, and I love the fact that those paper bells in the shop window look exactly like the ones we can still buy today. It gives one a comforting sense of continuity.

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  14. 1 thing i did notice,was how CLEAN his jacket / apron is,not very common round a butcher shop,
    jus sayin,,
    oldbear.

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  15. PJM:

    Your website sometimes makes by browser jam and my comments post two times or more and then I can't remove them.

    I don't know why.

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  16. I have been a "butcher" most of my working life, so I had to comment on this photo. A good look at the window display shows us that it is the holiday season: note the paper bells hanging with the meat. There is also a trimmed Christmas tree in the bottom of the display. There is, indeed, an airplane above the display. I believe Nate has it right as to what it is. The plane is a F VII. Interesting coincidence that FVII is the name of the clotting factor of blood that makes coagulation possible. Without it, the butcher would not have been able to make the blood sausage that is in the display, along with several other varieties of sausage. I also see head cheese, and smoked sausages. 'Tis the season to eat sausage. Note that the butcher is wearing wooden shoes.

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  17. He resembles Teddy Roosevelt.

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  18. Such funny coincidence, Rob From Amersfoorts' fathers' father being from Gorinchem, like mine. Newspapers of Gorinchem are online. Next to the butcher shop you can see a shop with "De Potteman" (the pot man). In the newspaper, it shows he is in Langendijk 132. The butcher is in Langendijk 133 (number is in the picture), there are at least 3 ads, including the birth of Robs aunt. The street still exists and is in the middle of the centre of this old city.

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