Wednesday, October 7, 2009

Nebraska Family

This is a picture of the J.C. Cram family in Loup County, Nebraska. The picture was taken in 1886. Lots of interesting details if you look at the picture. I wonder if those are bird cages on the house towards the right. I am really enjoying this series of pictures.

I have been wanting to have a week where you all sent in your favorite old family picture and we used those. The pictures would need to be old, they would need to be pictures that belong to you (not out of a book or copyrighted material), and they would need to be interesting. Portraits and studio pictures are usually not very interesting. Pictures of people doing real life things from the old days are the most interesting. If you are interested, and I get enough good ones sent in, we can try and do that for a week. If lots are sent in, I will have to pick some from the group, but hopefully we could all have fun with it. Scan at fairly high resolution, (about a megabyte file size) so we have something good to work with. Include a little info on who/where/when on the picture.

13 comments:

  1. That sure is a nice stack of antlers that is in the front yard.
    He also has a nice crop of boys to do work.
    And when I blew up the photo, I would say that they are bird cages with at least a bird in the left cage.
    R

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  2. Interestingly, the walls are sloped inward. Seems like a good idea but I haven't seen this type of construction in a simple house before. I am so glad you are showing all these old photos.

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  3. How did they keep the roof grass trimmed without the ever- popular roof cow?

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  4. Those are most likely canary cages. I read someplace - heaven knows where - that the emptiness of the prairie was literally maddening, and many families "imported" canaries from back East to keep them company.

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  5. Nice idea! Unfortunately I have not many old family pictures, but I’ll take a look in my archives. And I’m looking forward to the contributions of other OPOD followers.

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  6. I wonder if the lady is his wife or daughter. She looks young. Maybe it's his daughter. Possibly his wife is deceased.

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  7. I sent you some old pictures on your sonofthesouth e-mail address (I found no other one). Thought you might want to expand your collection toward the East of Europe :)

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  8. I like this photo because it shows construction details so well. I'd like to see a photo of the interior of a sod house. Not so easy with film speed in those days. Also note all the potted plants inside and outside the window. I suppose if a cow or calf couldn't eat the grass on the roof, a goat or sheep would do the job.
    Maybe if people have interesting photos of ancestors they could post on their own blog or album and leave links in comments here - it would be a way of adding supplemental images. Not every photo would meet PJM's requirement but would be an interesting to some. For example - even studio portraits can be interesting in hi res when one can see details of clothing, furniture, toys and pets. Ephemera can be quite interesting.

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  9. PJM:

    I love this series of photos!! It really provides a glimpse at prarie life. The details in the pictures are facsinating.

    For my family photo submission, would you please re-run the photo that I sent you of my mother, Eleanor, christening the submarine the USS PLAICE in 1943??

    It would be especially meaningful, since she just passed away in April

    Thank you.

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  10. PJM:

    I keep trying to vote in your polls, but the browser won't accept my vote.

    I read on the blog that someone else had the same problem, too.

    Anyway, I vote for the tractor!! You've earned it.

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  11. I'm like SmartGirl. Unable to get my vote to count. I vote YES

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  12. This week's topic is so timely. My 12 year old daughter is studying 'sod busters' in history class. Your Monday photo was used by her teacher in class this week!

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  13. It was the women who added the touches of being civilized with the birds and plants in the window. I bet she came from a better life back east.

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