Sunday, October 25, 2009

Mail Truck

This week we will be examining pictures associated with the Post Office and Mail Delivery. The picture above was taken in 1916, and shows a mail delivery truck. The truck has a sign promoting the idea that people should get a mailbox on the street. This would save the mailman the time of walking to the front door of each home.

OK, we did not have a winner in yesterday's contest. I really thought someone would get it. So, I reveal the mystery now. The woman had been arrested in 1902 for violating the Jim Crow laws. She sat with Blacks on an electric train. The woman was the Great Great Grand daughter of Martha Washington. She was the Daughter of Rebel General Robert E. Lee. She was Mary Custis Lee.

11 comments:

  1. You got to love his horn. The squeeze bulb for his horn is mounted up by the steering wheel and a tube seems to run down to some place under the hood.
    And his head lights are just a old style miner's lamps.
    R

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  2. Just a few days ago, I spent an afternoon visiting the Postal Museum in Washington DC. They had Model T truck, very similar to this one, on display. I learned that, before the P.O. required all customers to have mailboxes, the postman always rang the door bell (sometimes twice) and waited for someone to answer, thus wasting time.

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  3. We just had one of our mailmen arrest for drunk driving and speeding at 10"30 in the morning.
    R

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  4. I particularly think it is interesting that the government was promoting "saving time" - but not for the general public! "Come on', make it easy for the postman, he gets tired" just doesn't have the same ring to it!

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  5. +JMJ+

    Well, God bless her and Gen'l Lee! He was the only person who ever made it through West Point without one demerit, if I remember correctly. Top of his class.

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  6. Gerald has a point about whose time will be saved. Yet, perhaps the characterization of the mailbox's value should have been faster delivery when the postman only stopped in front of each house instead of delivering to each door.

    The headlights on the delivery vehicle are curious to me. Did any mail get delivered back then after sunset?

    This will be an interesting week of investigating our postal service from an earlier century. Our modern-day mail service has seen serious decline in view of the ease and speed of e-mail communications.

    Today's post offices are likely going to drop Saturday (or a least-busy weekday) delivery, and some post offices have already been shuttered.

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  7. THAT is a great story regarding the Mystery Person.

    As for mailboxes, I wish the mailman would get out and deliver to my doorstep. That would be great.

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  8. Wow, what a great mystery person. And how ironic.

    Re this week's topic, I'm sure it will provoke a lot of comments about the quality of the U.S. Postal Service today.

    I have a number of awful stories, including a drunk mailman.

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  9. GeezerNYC:

    And hence the origin of the title to the great 1846 film, "The Postman Always Rings Twice."

    That's one of my favorites.

    And . . . then 1981 remake with Jack Nicholson and Jessica Lange isn't too bad, either. One of the few remakes that worked!

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  10. Sorry, the 1946 film, not 1846. It's too early for me to be typing.

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  11. Smart Girl: I was hoping someone would catch the nod to two excellent films. I don't usually care for re-makes, but that was a good one.

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