Monday, July 27, 2009

Wash Day

This picture was taken in 1939 near El Indio, Texas. It shows a woman washing clothes in a wash tub. Above the wash tub is a clothes wringer, which was operated by crank, and was used to remove excess water from the clothes prior to putting on a clothes line. When I was growing up in the 60's, the woman who lived down the road washed clothes this way. In the background you can see a cast iron pot, probably used to heat water for washing.

I also notice a nice flock of chickens. Now that I have the peacock palace completed, I am thinking about getting some chickens. Country eggs are so much better than store bought, and I think I pretty much have every thing I need to get some chickens going.

11 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. The item on the left in the center of the picture is the washing machine. The clothes were washed in it then wrung into a rinse tub. Then rerung to hanf up to dry. I did notice that the black hot water tub on the far left, also had a wringer on it.
    R

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  3. I'm sorry, but when I relooked at the photo, I couuld see that the second wringer is mounted on another washing machine that can just be seen on the vwey edge of the photo.
    R

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  4. The clothes wringer was the greatest invention in the world! Before that, everything had to be wrung out by hand, from socks to sheets. I used a wringer machine myself for many, many years.
    The woman in the background looks as if she's wearing a split skirt. Much more practical for farm work than a regular skirt. Love the lace-up heels and the rolled-down stockings! Shades of my sainted grandmother!

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  5. I had no idea that peacocks and chickens could roost in the same coop. Will you need to build another house for them?

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  6. Al,
    My understanding is that chickens and peacocks will live together in domestic tranquility.
    PJM

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  7. In the mid-40s our Mom's washing machine had an electric agitator motor and a motor on the clothes wringer.

    After the wash she would wring out the excess wash-water from the clothes and drain the machine into a bucket.

    The buckets of wash water were emptied into the sink and then the washing machine was filled with rinse-water.

    After some rinse agitation the wringer got its final use for that wash-load. Just outside, in the back yard, were clothes lines.

    Monday was wash day. Tuesday was reserved for ironing. Our Mom worked in the home, every day, morning to night.

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  8. Back in the early 70s we were in El Paso and having babies. When the wife did the laundry (about half a million cloth diapers), she would hang them wet on the line outside and when she got them hung, she went back and started taking the dry diapers down. The temperatures were seldom below 95 during the day and the humidity hovered around 15%, so anything wet dries in a hurry - including the "lawn" we tried to start. But that is another story.

    Ah, good times.

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  9. The automatic washer and dryer is the best inventions ever

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  10. Most poultry and gamefowl get along great. But don't get some chicks or hens and throw them together the first day - give them a change to get aquainted with a screen between them for a while. What about the pen? Harmony comes when everyone has lots of space.

    I knew someone who had an interesting scar on her forearm where it had been caught in a wringer. Grab the tender flesh of your inner arm just below your elbow and pull hard. Now imagine that pinched in a wringer. Yep, we are lucky these days with our nice machines!

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  11. When my sister and I were kids, we had a neighbor who had a washing machine with a wringer.

    We were fascinated with it.

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