Wednesday, July 22, 2009

Texas Itinerate Farm Family

This picture was taken in 1913 and shows an itinerant farm family near Corsicana, Texas. I find this photograph very interesting. This large family is trying to make a living growing cotton on 50 acres. The entire family works the fields, which they rent. It was a very hard way to try and scratch out a living.

Domestic Update: Peacock Palace is Completed. This is a major milestone. Yesterday Cesar and the workmen finished up the Peacock Palace. I think it came out really nice. Mrs. PJM came home yesterday to find the job was complete, and she was delighted. We moved Lovie and the Chicks into the palace, and they were happy to get out of the little cage. Now, after reading up on peacocks, I am told we need to leave them closed up in there for 6 months for them to learn that this is their home. We will build a little pen behind the palace, all enclosed in hail screen. This will allow them to walk out the little back door of the palace, and have a little area to walk around in outside. I have to say the peacocks were a great move on my part, and has doubtlessly gained my many points with Mrs. PJM.



14 comments:

  1. Oh boy, this could have been a picture of my Daddy's family. He came from a large family (mostly girls), they traveled around Texas picking cotton and whatever work there was to be done. Only went back home for the winter months. Had very little schooling. They never named the towns they had worked in, just the counties. I loved to hear the stories they told. I could sit and listen all day.

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  2. In approximately 1920, my grandmother and her two older daughters picked cotton in southern Arizona. I remember a tale about a lizard. It was running for all its worth across the hot, hot ground. Then it flopped over onto its back and waved its little feet into the air and then back onto its feet again and sped away.

    When the ground is too hot for a lizard -------

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  3. I wonder how many of those children lived until adulthood.

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  4. Could it really be two families or two branches of a family? The two women seem to be mothers of the various small children. Perhaps a sister who's husband is no longer around and they teamed up to make ends meet.

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  5. That is really some Peacock Palace! They should be happy as clams in there! (whatever that means)

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  6. Do make a pen for the birds, they love to scratch and forage. It will also keep their claws the proper length and their toes straight.
    I can't imagine living in Texas now, much less back then! I'm too fond of the cool fog.

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  7. it must have been a depessing life. Not knowing from one week to the next if you will have a place to live or food to eat. how sad.

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  8. I have to be honest with you, PJM. I really thought the peacocks were a figment of your imagination; a funny story you invented to entertain your readers. I stand corrected.

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  9. Lucky peacocks!!

    Re the photo, that lifestyle was certainly difficult.

    But, I hope our nation never loses its unique work ethic; and I'm beginning to worry, what with all of the "entitlements" our government seems obligated to provide these days.

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  10. "Intinerant" means travelling. As these folks apparently stay on their 50 acre farm, they are not intinerant.

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  11. Make that itinerant.

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  12. Anon,
    Actually intended word was Itinerate . . . they rented land and moved from place to place.
    PJM

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  13. Actually, I think this family appears rather well-to-do. Yes, there are a lot of children, but my grandfather came from a family of 16 children (in Wyoming). This family has two horses, what appears to be a fairly sizeable house, and a toy(wagon). Except for the knees of the pants on the one man, they are dressed quite well.

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  14. Duene has a good point. The horses are also in good condition.
    What is considered poverty today was relatively prosperous 100 years ago.

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