Thursday, July 16, 2009

Suffrage Crowd

This picture was taken on Wall Street in New York in 1913. The picture shows Mrs. Pankhurst standing in her car in a Suffrage parade. The size of the crowd is somewhat surprising. I find it interesting to look at the people in the crowd. Every person is wearing a hat. Also, notice the homogeneity of the crowd. Today, you would never see such a homogeneous crowd of this size.

11 comments:

  1. It looks like all those men are laughing at her. We've come a long way, lady, and it's sweet.

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  2. I guess what surprises me is that this was 1913 and Wyoming had given the right to vote to women in 1869. I guess when you treat people as ornaments rather than partners, your vision gets cloudy.

    As for the homogeneity of the crowd, it's hard not to look like everybody else when your choice of attire is relatively limited. No cheap, but flamboyant clothing made by virtual slave labor.

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  3. Amen, Mathan; and thank you for the partner nod.

    Mrs. Pankhurst's female associates look none to pleased with the situation.

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  4. Here is some history on franchise for women in Wyoming.
    http://www.autrynationalcenter.org/explore/exhibits/suffrage/suffrage_wy.html

    Don't assume from an old black and white photo that everyone was all that homogenous. They did not all wear dark gray suits and hats back then, it just looks dark grey in the photo. Smaller wardrobes were the norm then so of course clothing is more uniform, but the individuality is concealed due to various factors. Hats cover hair and conceal a portion of the face, so hair color,texture and complexion was concealed.

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  5. New Jersey had the closest thing to Universal Sufferage in the United States immediately after the American Revolution. Both women and "persons of color" were allowed to vote, *IF* they were property owners. Since married women did not own property in their own name, only single women or widows could vote. The rational behind this was that allowing married women to vote would give each family two votes. I don't know the percentage of free blacks who owned property, but I don't imagine it was very large.

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  6. What an amazing photo. the crowd is almost all men. I bet they didn't turn out to cheer the ladies on.

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  7. I remember back in the early 1940s, the only time my grandpa made sure my grandmama went to town, was on election day. She probably voted for who ever he wanted her to.

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  8. The franchise was very restrictive in the early days of America.
    http://tinyurl.com/kpu88e

    Most people could NOT vote.

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  9. Nice selection of photos the past several days. We can learn so much from these photos. Have you noticed how many people seem more interested in the photographer than the speaker.

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  10. I noticed the hats on Tuesdays photo...even on the children. But my question is WHY? I am not sure what time of year this was taken, but did the weather play a role? It looks more like it was part of a "uniform"

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  11. An other funny point is the face of the few people who notice that someone was taking a picture and smile!

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