Wednesday, June 3, 2009

Homesteaders

This picture was taken in 1940, and shows a homesteader couple. The picture was taken in Pie Town, New Mexico. I love these old pictures of homesteaders. I like the idea of a couple given a chance at the American Dream. I am sure it was a hard life, but with land, they were given a shot at success.

12 comments:

  1. What I always find amazing is how fast things change. In the 1860's, the Lakota are defending their way of life along the "Bloody Bozeman". Twenty years later, cattlemen are "defending" their way of life by importing gunmen from Texas to kill off immigrants. Twenty years later, a young Scotsman and his wife arrive are try to make a living and raise a family in the New World on a homestead. All in the same relative place.

    Amazing.

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  2. The lady has on a short sleeved dress that wasn't made from flour sacks. Neither was her apron. Maybe this is her Sunday-go-to meeting dress. She must have been cooking a meal or washing dishes, to have her sleeves pushed up. A homesteader or rancher would have protected her arms, of necessity not fashion.

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  3. Another great photo. Thanks! I was planning to go to Albuquerque area and the VLBA in Soccorro. That is a very scenic and lovely area of New Mexico, less travelled by tourists. September/October is my favorite time to vist that area.

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  4. PJM,
    What's your connection with Pie Town, NM? I grew up in New Mexico (Las Vegas, Santa Fe, and Clovis). It's a great state.

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  5. I love seeing these photos of homesteaders. My grandfather and grandmother were homesteaders. They lived 17 miles north of Wagon Mound New Mexico / 8 miles south of Springer in a little place called Levy in 1908. I remember the stories they told about dust storms and the hard life. They would take their grain to a mill called La Cueva Mill and also to Mora Mill. They had five boys while they struggled to make a living there. One little boy named Richard died and is buried at a place called Wagon Mound NM. They finally moved back to the Midwest, but for all it's harshness, I think my grandparents really loved New Mexico. Grandpa kept a journal and wrote some short stories about their life in New Mexico. He also painted pictures which we really treasure.

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  6. Heather, Very interesting. My great-grandparents also homesteaded in several places in New Mexico. They even started a town named Red Lake, NM, and I have my great-grandmother's journal about it. Because there was no water, they finally had to leave--thus, no more Red Lake, NM. This was in 1904.

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  7. Hi Judielynn, that's so cool that our grandparents were homesteading about the same time. I'll have to look at a map to see if Red Lake was near Levy. According to Grandpas writings, there was a creek nearby called Sweetwater Creek. I'll have to look at a map and see where all these places are located. I think my grandparents left NM around 1916.

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  8. Heather, Red Lake, NM was about 5 miles west of Dora, NM (Roosevelt County). It is considered a ghost town now, and there are no remains.

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  9. i am really admiring the colors in these photos.. does anyone know if the rich shades are due to some special photographic technique? or development process?

    just beautiful...

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  10. The coloring does appear similar for all these pictures as I commented yesterday. It seems to be that time a little after sundown when the colors seem more muted or subtle.

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  11. I believe these are 4x5 Kodachrome. This film was known for its vibrant colors and durability.

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  12. Did you see Final Jeopardy tonight (6/3)? It reminded me of the Saturday Mystery Person contests. There were pictures of two people with rhyming names and you had to identify them just from the picture. Mystery person could be preparing someone to win thousands on Jeopardy!

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