Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Pretty Lady

Today we continue our study of Beauties of Bygone Eras. Yesterday the photograph was from 1893, and today's picture was taken in 1918. It is amazing how norms changed in that period of what was considered attractive. It is also interesting how norms changed on what clothing or costume would be considered acceptable. This definitely already has a look of the Roaring 20's. The woman was Marie Prevost, who I believe was an actress of the day.

10 comments:

  1. Marie came to an untimely end due to alcoholism and was immortalized in a song by Nick Lowe on the album Pure Pop for Now People.

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  2. You're kidding, right? She's gorgeous. Sure, the clothes look silly to us, but so do the bellbottoms my 12 year old wore to school today.

    Smokin!

    -XC

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  3. I find it interesting to see how the photographer has used subtle imagery to show provocative activity without breaking the "rules" of the day. Little things say a lot, like one stocking lower on the leg to show an element of undress. the inviting nature as she stands outside the bedroom door.
    Beautiful lady by any standards

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  4. She was beautiful, no doubt about it, even by today's standards.

    I would think the photo would have been considered a little racy, even for the "roaring 20s."

    The photo is beautifully staged.

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  5. I suppose we could compare these recent posts to the Farrah Fawcett poster of the '7Os. She was pretty, men would say attractive (or smokin'), but modesty begets true beauty in the eyes of many beholders. I've noticed such on this site in the various comments on more clothed portraits.

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  6. I am going to try to resist thinking this was anything near ordinary in 1893 - she looks great, but I don't think you can show this in prime time today. 1893 was a very good year from what I have seen so far..

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  7. Hehe, you can see lots of this girl with this kind of outfit in Bucharest clubs nowadays. Minus the feather, of course.

    Sorry, for me this kind of image is not too close to the definition of beauty. It's asking to much for it :) if you catch my drift.

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  8. Sorry, it was "too much", not "to much"

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  9. Actually Marie died of starvation brought on by excessive dieting. She is mostly remembered for being devoured by her dog after her demise.

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  10. Wow. Not bad at all.

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