Sunday, March 15, 2009

George Armstrong Custer

This is a photograph of General George Armstrong Custer. Custer actually became somewhat famous during the Civil War. He was a cavalry officer, and was known for his reckless style. He sought glory, and was not too concerned what happened to his men, as long as he got the victory.

OK, I had a lot of fun yesterday on the Mystery Person Contest. I like it when there are lots of people playing, and the game goes on for a while. Once again, my Arch Rival and nemesis Nate Maas made a mockery of my contest by winning. So far, I have only been able to defeat him by being sneaky and having a contest while I know he will be at work. Also, did you notice that he signed up on the left margin to be a "follower" of this blog. By doing this, he has his picture show up on every page of my blog. Look over on the left margin, and see the little picture of him. Do you notice the smirk on his face? It is like he is just sitting there taunting me. Every page, there he is. Well, we will see who is smirking next Saturday. I already have the picture picked out, and the text written, and everything ready to go. It will be the best contest ever. I predict that Nate comes up with some flimsy excuse like his Internet was not working or something. Anyway, next Saturday will be the best contest ever. Please tune in, and watch Mr. Maas eat a little crow.

14 comments:

  1. I think you meant "reckless" though "wreckless" has a certain piquancy with regard to GAC.

    -XC

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  2. Custer's brother Tom was a two time Medal of Honor recipient.

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  3. XC,
    Correction made. Missed that one.
    PJM

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  4. PJM:

    Hi, Paul. Did you know that someone on yesterday's blog thinks that I am YOU in disguise!!!

    HAHA - But I'll certainly take that as a compliment!!!

    Everyone remembers Custer for the Indian thing, instead of the civil war.

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  5. PJM:

    Hi, Paul. Did you know that someone on yesterday's blog thinks that I am YOU in disguise!!!

    HAHA - But I'll certainly take that as a compliment!!!

    Everyone remembers Custer for the Indian thing, instead of the civil war.

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  6. I forgot (again):

    You can tell from Custer's eyes and his whole posture that he was reckless, egotistical, and a big risk-taker.

    He reminds me somewhat of Napoleon.

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  7. SmartGirl,
    Yes I saw someone yesterday was saying that there was no SmartGirl, that I had concocted the whole thing to make it look like I had people interested in my blog. Now that is an interesting concept . . . how do people know that I did not concoct everyone . . . there is no Heather, or Ray in the UK, or Bob, or Marie, or Sheila . . . It all PJM concocting everything. Also, Nate Maas is a figmant of my imagination. Anyway, I thought is was a funny post, and I can promise that I am not SmartGirl, or anyone other than PJM.

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  8. PJM:

    It reminds me of that Twilight Zone episode where the successful playwright could create real-life characters by just dictating into a tape recorder!!

    Do you remember that one?

    His shrewish wife comes home to find him with a demure blonde serving drinks to him in the study. The wife demands to know who she is, and he says he made her up and she came to life.

    The wife decideds to have him committed.

    The playwright takes a small reel-to-reel tape out of his desk, and throws it in the fire, and the wife disappears!!

    Then he pulls out a new tape and plays it, and the blonde comes back!

    THAT'S ME

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  9. Custer's enormous ego and carelessness was rewarded at The Battle of the Little Bighorn by Sitting Bull.

    In those days, when the white army won in battle it was declared a great victory. When American Indians won it was declared a senseless massacre.

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  10. Custer is a very curious figure and highly flamboyant. I always take note when old army figures spend too much time designing their own uniforms for their liking for any reason besides practicality. His vanity earned him the Civil War nickname, "Cinnamon," because he would spend hours combing and treating his hair with cinnamon tonic.

    Regarding the Medal of Honor, I have also found it curious how the award has been given over time. During the Civil War, the vast majority were given for capturing Confederate flags. By the Indian Wars it was given for gallantry. During the Spanish-American War, the citation often read something including "coolness under fire." The Philippine Insurrection awards were often given for charging a larger force with others. Boxer Rebellion was "meritorious conduct." WWI were often for message delivery or taking out machine guns. WWII and Korea gave many awards for falling on a grenade or sacrificing your life. By Vietnam, the number of medics receiving the award had greatly increased.

    It just seems curious that in different times, different actions were seen as more worthy of the medal.

    Regarding next Saturday, looks like we're going to have to bring our A-game, but I'm still confident that the Internet can best PJM!

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  11. Kent Says,

    I tried to resist, but then PJM put up ole' GAC.

    Only Washington and Lincoln have more books written about them than the Boy General and Little Bighorn. When my father passed away over a decade ago his library was incomplete with some 60 volumes on Custer. Dad was on the Indian's side.

    A fascinating read is a 2001 historical novel "An Uncommon Enemy" by Michelle Black. The novel follows Eden Murdoch's revenge against Custer.

    She was a real life captive of the Cheyenne. The story begins with her rescue by Custer at the battle of the Washita. She tries to assimilate into white culture, but returns to her indian ways. The novel ends with the battle of Greasy Grass or as the whites knew it, Little Bighorn and her revenge.

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  12. The stories of the our treatment of the Indians all over the US do not paint the home of the free and the brave in a good light. So much deceit and failed promises left the Indians a lost, valuable asset to this country.

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  13. Anyone ever read the short story "Custer's Last Jump" by Howard Waldrop? Alternate history SF with biplanes and parachute jumps at the Little Big Horn. It actually works extremely well.

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  14. Yeah...this 'man' is wellknown...it also explains the way he wears his hat...My father had a keen eye to see how someone was just by the way the person wore his hat. And he was always right!

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