Tuesday, January 27, 2009

Children Playing

This picture shows a group of little black girls playing. It was taken in 1938 in Lafayette, Louisiana. This picture reminds me how much fun it was to play as a child. You could not wait for recess, and could not wait for school to be out, so you could play. Somehow, things were never quiet as much fun as an adult.

20 comments:

  1. "Somehow, things were never quiet as much fun as an adult."

    They can be, but those people, like outlaw bikers and playboy millionaires, tend to annoy the rest of us. ;o)

    Aside: I wonder why, when captioning this picture, you found it necessary to point out these are black children?

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  2. I love rhythm 'n blues
    and have just downloaded
    a Robert Johnson CD.

    The photographer caught
    the children's rhythm
    beautifully.

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  3. I agree with the comment about the unnecessary use of "black" in the caption. If they were white, would it have been captioned "white." Sure, it was harmless, but we need to think about what we are saying.

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  4. Well, they ARE black children. Why is everyone so touchy.

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  5. The United States of the Offended.

    Sheesh! Relax. It's a picture. Not a platform for the NAACP & ACLU.

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  6. When I was a kid, we used to play outside all the time and run around.

    I never see children playing outside anymore. I think they're inside with video games--a fun distraction, I'll agree, but come ON! You need to get out and play with the other neighborhood kids!!

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  7. This is a great photo, and it really captures the moment.

    And . . .I bet those kids were in a lot better shape had more fun than some of the kids today who sit in front of computers or play video games for hours on end.

    And . . .to those who wrote comments about the use of the word "black" in describing the children, LIGHTEN UP.

    It's just a picture, the author of this website isn't burning a cross on your front lawn!!

    Honestly, all of this "political correctness" is nauseating.

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  8. "Sure, it was harmless, but we need to think about what we are saying."

    I'm not breaking balls, or putting PJM on the spot, and not much concerned with political correctness in what we're saying.
    But we all have opportunities, like this one, to examine how we are thinking. Inner thoughts.

    One of the first things we notice about a person (or picture of a person), is their color, along with posture, height, apparent weight, and how they're dressed.

    When captioning a picture, you usually add information that isn't apparent... or seems out of place. Think about it.

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  9. People can always find something to be offended about if they try hard enough.
    I'm White, my daughter is Black. In conversation with me she sometimes refers to kids at school as "the White boys" or "the Black boys". I know she isn't prejudiced, the words are used to distinguish which boys she's talking about.
    Forget being "politically correct." Let those who offend easily go watch TV or something.

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  10. Oddly,

    When I look at just the kids play, their intensity makes it look pretty contemporary, but then I look at the car and it makes it look timeless.

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  11. In my youth children played outdoors. We were slim and wiry.

    We ate three meals a day, no snacks in between. Some TV in the evening.

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  12. To xoxoxoBruce:

    And . . . your point is EXACTLY the problem. As a society, we spend way too much time examining what we say; or delving into our "inner" thoughts; and/or overdosing on every little piece of excessive and useless information that we are bombarded with from the media.

    Whatever happened to just doing the best you can and living your life?

    Not EVERYTHING in this world has to have a hidden, deeper meaning.

    I am not racist, but the children in that photo ARE black. So what?

    And . . by trying to AVOID mentioning it and criticizing those who did, you actually made it a bigger issue that it should have been. It is what it is, and people are always going to be initially judged by their appearance.

    The author of this blog can add whatever he wants to the captions on the pictures, and if you find it offensive, don't look at them.

    Your entire comment is a contradiction. First you claim you are not concerned with "politcal correctness", but then you go on to argue why we have to think that way.

    I agree with Heather. Save your energy for more important issues. After all, the photo wasn't of a lynching or a race riot.

    It's just a bunch of kids.

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  13. "Your entire comment is a contradiction. First you claim you are not concerned with "politcal correctness", but then you go on to argue why we have to think that way."

    You miss the point. No, I'm not argueing why we have to think one way or the other.
    It's the same as if it were white, yellow, or red girls, and mentioned it in the caption.
    I'm saying it's things like this that offer an opportunity to examine how we think about people, what input we value, and what we discard.

    Oh, and for those that think I'm being critical of PJM, you don't get it... sorry I ruffled your feathers...talk about being touchy.

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  14. I can't wait to see a picture of a FAT WHITE person and see what it says....I'm fat....so what if someone labels a picture of a fat white person as a fat white person....it is what it is.

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  15. Here, here Calibama, agreed. People these days are just waiting to be offended. Toughen up people, we're in for a rougher ride in days to come than our complaciant asses are used to.

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  16. xoxoxo Bruce:

    No, YOU missed the point. You stated that "it's things like this that offer an opportunity to examine how we think about people, what input we value, and what we discard."

    Well, I (and others) are saying that its overkill to read so much into that picture and the blogger's comments. There are times for that sort of thing, and this wasn't one of them.

    Everything doesn't have to be so serious and introspective.

    I don't walk around with a sign on my forhead that says "HEY EVERYONE, IM ITALIAN-AMERICAN, AND MY GRANDPARENTS WERE REALLY POOR IMMIGRANTS AND THEY EXPERIENCED A LOT OF DISCRIMINATION, SO EVERYONE HAD BETTER WATCH WHAT THEY SAY TO ME."

    You actually made the racial issue bigger. And . . .those kids were BLACK, sorry.

    Honestly. You must spend all your time watching Oprah and Dr. Phil.

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  17. No "smartgirl", Anonymous#1 made it racial. Sorry you don't get it.

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  18. OFF TOPIC:

    PJM, I noticed that you have a feature which allows a reader to expand/collapse comments. I've been looking for a festure such as this for my own blog, as the comments are embedded below the posts. Can you provide me any information or direct me to a how-to perhaps.

    So jealous,

    --Jamie

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  19. All I want to say is that I think it's a great picture. I'll leave the debate for those give a heck.

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