Tuesday, January 6, 2009

Atlanta Train Depot

This is an unusual picture of Atlanta, Georgia, taken in 1864. You can see a period locomotive, and what looks like a depot in the background.

My family lived in the Atlanta area in 1864, and I can remember growing up there was still hard feelings towards Sherman, and what he did to Atlanta, and the rest of Georgia in his March to the Sea.

14 comments:

  1. the Bendigo train station still sorta looks like that its lovely to look at and inspiring to stand on the bridge and see the men working away.- the old brick arched depot bit is beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Well, that picture would have to have been taken before fall of 1864 because there weren't two bricks still standing in Atlanta after Sherman went through.

    -XC

    ReplyDelete
  3. ah, the Sherman myth. Sherman didn't destroy Atlanta, and he only tore things up in a measley 60 mile wide swath through Georgia on his way to the sea. The damage sustained in Atlanta was exactly similar to what is going on in the Gaza right now: the soldiers were hiding behind the skirts of the brave women and children of the city. Sherman begged Hood to leave the city. Hood was a coward, and a stupid one at that.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Would not Hood leaving at the bequest of Sherman be more cowardly? Atlanta was a major transportation hub for the conferacy and therefore be defended.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Kent said,

    Civil war railroading is fascinating and mind boggling. 16 trains of 10 cars carried 16 tons of material at 10 mph to support Sherman. Grenville Dodge rebuilt 182 mi. of track and 182 bridges in 40 days by literally tearing down and rebuilding mills and blacksmith foundries along the way. In one campaign to relieve Rosecrans, the USMRR ran 5 min. intervals of 30 trains consisting of 600 cars 1200 mi. in 11.5 days. They moved 25,000 men ten artillery batteries, horses and 100 cars of baggage.

    Part of their success is attributed to the industrialized North with a standard track width. The South didn't think that way and had as many different track gauges as they had railroads with very little of them interconnecting.

    The Civil War was brutal, Sherman epitomizes this brutality. A very fine historical (and captivating I might add) novel about his march to the sea is E. L. Doctorow's "The March".

    ReplyDelete
  6. Regardless of what Sherman did or did not do, I certainly would not have wanted to be a person living in Atlanta with his arrival imminent! The fear and uncertainty must have been awful.

    ReplyDelete
  7. you grew up in Atlanta in 1864? you hide your age well.... LOL!
    just kidding. Couldn't resist!
    Have a blessed day.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I've just found your site and am just thrilled with it! I'll be following. BTW, What weekly poll?
    Nancy

    ReplyDelete
  9. Welcome Nancy, and thank you for the kind words. The weekly poll refers to a little poll that is on this site each week in the upper left corner. This poll is a little bit of a joke this week, as one answer is "I never answer poll questions", which of course, would require someone to answer to select that choice.

    Again, Welcome.
    PJM

    ReplyDelete
  10. aww Atlanta, I was there 11 months ago, it has changed a lot!

    ReplyDelete
  11. @anon: The damage sustained in Atlanta was exactly similar to what is going on in the Gaza right now: the soldiers were hiding behind the skirts of the brave women and children of the city.

    Ah, I am thinking of a word, it starts with "A".

    As for Sherman not destroying Atlanta, well, that is certainly an unusual take on history. Have any theories on the holocaust, Dresden, the Trilateral commish, etc?

    -XC

    ReplyDelete
  12. Great old photo. My ancestors were just about 60 miles south of Atlanta when Shermans men came through. They camped upon my great, great grandparents land for three days and nights, killing all the chickens and pigs, and making my great, great grandmother stay up and help cook for them.(my great, great grandpa was off fighting in the war) She had sent the slaves into the fieids to hide her hams so they were saved. This story was handed down through the generations and I think of the courage it must have took to have braved all of this.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I second the recommendation for reading Doctorow's "The March." As historical fiction, the history is accurate. As fiction, the well-realized characters run the gamut from high to low, good to bad on both sides. The portrait of Sherman is interestingly complex. The confusing plight of the freed slaves is poignantly portrayed as are love affairs and some tender care that flourished in the cracks and crannies of daily life that always has to go on amid any calamity.
    Thanks Patti for sharing your family story. My dad was from Missouri and I had two great-great uncles who fought in the war, one for the North and one for the South. My father still had some memorabilia from them that I saw when I was a kid--I remember a razor and a strop. It was not all that distant a conflict for me.

    ReplyDelete
  14. It is amazing to me that these feelings have lingered for so many years.......what a time to have lived through. Patty, I really enjoyed your account of your GG Grandparents- and the slaves hiding the hams in the fields.....wow!

    ReplyDelete