Wednesday, January 9, 2008

Women's Fashions, 1930's

I am always surprised at the stark contrast between the photographs from the 1920's and 1930's. There was such abundance, and yes, such excess in the 1920's. When you look at the pictures from that era, you just have to look at the people and think that they had no idea what was about to hit them. I find it interesting to compare a typical picture from the 20's (posted yesterday), and a typical picture from the 30's (posted today). My how things had changed.
My father grew up during the depression, and it affected his entire life. He was a successful businessman, but he never forgot the days of the Great Depression. I can remember growing up he had a rule in our house that you never tore off a complete paper towel. He would say "That's what they want you to do. Don't tear it off at the perforation, just tear off the amount you need." He also insisted that lights not be left on when not in use, that food never be wasted, and that you should never pay someone to do a job that you could do yourself. So, we never had a maid or yard man or anything like that. At the time I was growing up with all these rules, I just thought he was cheap, and a hard man. Today, I see that he loved us, and never wanted us to face a situation like he did as a child. Today, I can appreciate his love, and his wisdom. By the way, today is my Dad's birthday. He just turned 88. He still does not use complete paper towels, and when I visit, still asks me to turn the lights out if they are not needed. Happy Birthday Dad. Thank you for your love, and the lessons you taught me.

6 comments:

  1. Ya know, Paul - as spectacular a job as you do finding great old photos, sometimes your stories eclipse the images you find. :)

    Happy birthday to your Dad!

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  2. Clew,
    Thanks for the kind words. I always appreciate your comments and contributions to the blog.
    Thanks!
    Paul

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  3. A belated happy birthday greeting to your father Paul. Thank you to all those who did experience the great depression so we would not have to. e.

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  4. It was so interesting reading your post about fashion in the 1930's. I am doing a project with students discussing life in the 1930's and this was very helpful!
    -Emilee

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  5. This was such an interesting read...thanks for the information regarding life in the 1930's!
    -Emilee

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  6. Loved your post. The thirties were a fascinating period. I've interviewed many people who lived through the thirties and was amazed that often faces would light up - and then the stories began. Despite, or maybe because of the deprivation, the stories were absolutely amazing. What an incredible era!

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